Giovanni Sansavini: Catalogue data in Autumn Semester 2021

Name Prof. Dr. Giovanni Sansavini
FieldReliability and Risk Engineering
Address
Reliability and Risk Engineering
ETH Zürich, LEE M 201
Leonhardstrasse 21
8092 Zürich
SWITZERLAND
Telephone+41 44 632 50 38
E-mailsansavig@ethz.ch
URLhttp://www.rre.ethz.ch/
DepartmentMechanical and Process Engineering
RelationshipAssociate Professor

NumberTitleECTSHoursLecturers
151-0221-00LIntroduction to Modeling and Optimization of Sustainable Energy Systems4 credits3GG. Sansavini, A. Bardow
AbstractThis course introduces the fundamentals of energy system modeling for the analysis and the optimization of the energy system design and operations.
ObjectiveAt the end of this course, students will be able to:
- define and quantify the key performance indicators of sustainable energy systems;
- select and apply appropriate models for conversion, storage and transport of energy;
- develop mathematical models for the analysis, design and operations of multi-energy systems and solve them with appropriate mathematical tools;
- select and apply methodologies for the uncertainty analysis on energy systems models;
- apply the acquired knowledge to tackle the challenges of the energy transition.
ContentThe global energy transition; Key performance indicators of sustainable energy systems; Optimization models; Heat integration and heat exchanger networks; Life-cycle assessment; Models for conversion, storage and transport technologies; Multi-energy systems; Design, operations and analysis of energy systems; Uncertainties in energy system modeling.
Lecture notesLecture slides and supplementary documentation will be available online. Reference to appropriate book chapters and scientific papers will be provided.
151-1633-00LEnergy Conversion
This course is intended for students outside of D-MAVT.
4 credits3GI. Karlin, G. Sansavini
AbstractThis course provides the students with an introduction to thermodynamics and energy conversion. Students shall gain basic understanding of energy and energy interactions as well as their link to energy conversion technologies.
ObjectiveThermodynamics is key to understanding and use of energy conversion processes in Nature and technology. Main objective of this course is to give a compact introduction into basics of Thermodynamics: Thermodynamic states and thermodynamic processes; Work and Heat; First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics. Students shall learn how to use energy balance equation in the analysis of power cycles and shall be able to evaluate efficiency of internal combustion engines, gas turbines and steam power plants. The course shall extensively use thermodynamic charts to building up students’ intuition about opportunities and restrictions to increase useful work output of energy conversion. Thermodynamic functions such as entropy, enthalpy and free enthalpy shall be used to understand chemical and phase equilibrium. The course also gives introduction to refrigeration cycles, combustion and refrigeration. The course compactly covers the standard course of thermodynamics for engineers, with additional topics of a general physics interest (nonideal gas equation of state and Joule-Thomson effect) also included.
Content1. Thermodynamic systems, states and state variables
2. Properties of substances: Water, air and ideal gas
3. Energy conservation in closed and open systems: work, internal energy, heat and enthalpy
4. Second law of thermodynamics and entropy
5. Energy analysis of steam power cycles
6. Energy analysis of gas power cycles
7. Refrigeration and heat pump cycles
8. Nonideal gas equation of state and Joule-Thomson effect
9. Maximal work and exergy
10. Mixtures
11. Chemical reactions and combustion systems; chemical and phase equilibrium
Lecture notesLecture slides and supplementary documentation will be available online.
LiteratureThermodynamics: An Engineering Approach, by Cengel, Y. A. and Boles, M. A., McGraw Hill
Prerequisites / NoticeThis course is intended for students outside of D-MAVT.

Students are assumed to have an adequate background in calculus, physics, and engineering mechanics.
Fostered competenciesFostered competencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingassessed
Media and Digital Technologiesnot assessed
Problem-solvingassessed
Project Managementnot assessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationnot assessed
Cooperation and Teamworknot assessed
Customer Orientationnot assessed
Leadership and Responsibilityassessed
Self-presentation and Social Influence not assessed
Sensitivity to Diversitynot assessed
Negotiationnot assessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilitynot assessed
Creative Thinkingassessed
Critical Thinkingassessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsassessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection not assessed
Self-direction and Self-management assessed
363-1162-00LResilience in the New Age of Risk3 credits2VH. Schernberg, C. Hölscher, J. Jörin, G. Sansavini
AbstractWith the global increase in interconnectivity, the potential for disruption is everywhere. Modern organisations who build resilience in all systems will respond intelligently to emergent disruptions. This course explores the concept of resilience and its application to socio-technical systems: The resilience of infrastructure systems and how individuals and social groups interact in and with them.
ObjectiveAfter taking this course, you will be able to:
- Discuss the concept of resilience and related frameworks and concepts, and explain their relevance in different contexts (organizations, infrastructure, social groups…).
- Use and discuss key resilience metrics and use them to analyze infrastructure systems.
- Discuss the role of organizational resilience and describe methods to improve it.
- Describe how resilience is applied in practice.
ContentOur increasingly complex and connected systems face continuously emerging disruptions. Resilience constitutes a fundamental departure from the philosophy of risk-management. With resilience, stakeholders adopt risk mitigation strategies aligned to the theories of complex systems.

It is, however, difficult to learn about resilience, since it applies to an extremely large array of systems and contexts. Moreover, the topic of resilience is surprisingly absent from most university curricula. This course fills a gap and walks you through a mode of thinking that is bound to shape the way risks and disasters are dealt with in our increasingly connected society. Hence, tomorrow's risk managers will and shall also be "resilience managers".

This course breaks down the concept of complex systems and their resilience. It introduces some of the different flavors of resilience and provides tools for building it in various socially relevant areas (social resilience, engineered systems resilience, organizational resilience...).

The course is divided in 4 parts.
- Part 1: Foundations of Resilience (4 hours)
- Part 2: Resilience Analysis: Infrastructure Systems (10 hours)
- Part 3: Organizational resilience and sensemaking (6 hours)
- Part 4: Resilience in Practice (4 hours)

Part 1 introduces the concept of resilience, and the framework in which it is applied. The distinction between resilience and risk management is highlighted, as well as how these approaches complement each other. The founding concepts of resilience are explained and illustrated: vulnerability, disruption, absorption, recovery, adaptation, etc.

Part 2 walks you through the analysis of the resilience of infrastructure systems. It introduces the useful metrics of resilience. It provides examples of building resilience into complex systems, by increasing the robustness and recoverability of systems, and reducing vulnerabilities. Finally, students will explore the optimization of infrastructure systems.

Part 3. Every system subject to potential disruptions is managed by a human organization. Sensemaking describes how humans frame the problem. It is a process whereby organizational actors attach meaning to external events to resolve the uncertainty surrounding them. Investing in mindfulness improves personal and organizational resilience and success. Finally, the management of organizational resilience is discussed.

Part 4 will provide examples of the use of resilience by practitioners, with guest speakers from the public and private sector.

This course is aimed at MSc and MAS students, from MTEC and other departments. Ideally, students have a quantitative background and some knowledge of risk management.
LiteratureThe Science and Practice of Resilience, Book by Benjamin D. Trump and Igor Linkov
Prerequisites / NoticeThe course is hybrid (in-person or remote).
Fostered competenciesFostered competencies
Subject-specific CompetenciesConcepts and Theoriesassessed
Techniques and Technologiesassessed
Method-specific CompetenciesAnalytical Competenciesassessed
Decision-makingnot assessed
Media and Digital Technologiesnot assessed
Problem-solvingnot assessed
Project Managementnot assessed
Social CompetenciesCommunicationnot assessed
Cooperation and Teamworknot assessed
Customer Orientationnot assessed
Leadership and Responsibilitynot assessed
Self-presentation and Social Influence not assessed
Sensitivity to Diversitynot assessed
Negotiationnot assessed
Personal CompetenciesAdaptability and Flexibilitynot assessed
Creative Thinkingnot assessed
Critical Thinkingnot assessed
Integrity and Work Ethicsnot assessed
Self-awareness and Self-reflection not assessed
Self-direction and Self-management not assessed